Forget Carter : Newcastle on film and television by Chris Phipps

  • By Louise Freeman
  • 28 Sep, 2017

Media historian Chris Phipps takes us on his tour of Newcastle’s film and TV covering old favourites like Payroll and Auf Wiedersehen Pet and shining light on some hidden gems such as The One and Only, Unconditional and The Clouded Yellow.

Many people know and associate Newcastle with TV and Film icons Get Carter, Byker Grove, The Tube and Our Friends in the North. However, do you know where Ralph Richardson stole money from in 1939? Why a den of spies were living in Jesmond in 1951? Who met Tommy Lee Jones on the High Level Bridge in 1988? Why Gateshead High Street was under siege in 2009? and which Newcastle flats seem to appear in every programme or film made in Newcastle?

Chris Phipps was the BBC’s Black Country Correspondent in the1970s.  He moved to the North East to produce Channel 4’s flagship rock show The Tube from Tyne Tees Television in Newcastle from 1982 to 1987.  Since then his passionate and expert knowledge of entertainment and popular music has been captured on radio, television, film, print and the speaker’s rostrum.  His ITV series Northstars and documentary Chris Rea – Hard is the Road both received prestigious Royal Television Society Awards. 

Come and hear Chris talk about his long career in film and television in the North East as part of our FREE Week One.  

Chris will be speaking from 10.45 to 11.45 and 12.30 to 13.30 on Tuesday 3rd October 2017 in the Green Room on the 4th floor of Commercial Union House.

There will be an opportunity to buy a signed copy of Chris's new book Forget Carter: Newcastle on Film and Television after the talks.

Click here to book your free place for Chris's talks.  

Thanks to Chris's publisher Tyne Bridge Publishing for their support with this event.

Explore Lifelong Learning blog

By Louise Freeman 03 Oct, 2017

Max Adams  is a critically-acclaimed author and biographer, an archaeologist,  traveller and writing coach. His journeys through the landscapes of the past and the present, of human geography, music, art and culture are a continuing source of inspiration in his writing.

Ælfred's Britain will be published by Head of Zeus on 2nd November 2017.

Max writes

For an author of Dark Age history to tackle the Viking Age (roughly 800-950) might seem an obvious book project.  Abundant material, both literary and artistic, propels an irresistible narrative of  warriors and heroic struggle, while the contemporary relevance of Christian states struggling against a predatory foe with apocalyptic ideologies seems obvious.  And yet, in writing about Britain, the whole of Britain, in this period, daunting challenges emerge.  To begin with, the canvas is vast, encompassing all of Atlantic Europe and beyond.  The available sources – Viking sagas written more than two hundred years after the events they describe; an Anglo-Saxon Chronicle with a strong pro-Wessex bias, must be treated with caution.  They are also patchy: we have very little indeed for Scotland and Wales in this period– we hear of those kingdoms primarily through sketchy news reaching the distant ears of Irish annalists.

By Louise Freeman 28 Sep, 2017

Many people know and associate Newcastle with TV and Film icons Get Carter, Byker Grove, The Tube and Our Friends in the North. However, do you know where Ralph Richardson stole money from in 1939? Why a den of spies were living in Jesmond in 1951? Who met Tommy Lee Jones on the High Level Bridge in 1988? Why Gateshead High Street was under siege in 2009? and which Newcastle flats seem to appear in every programme or film made in Newcastle?

By Louise Freeman 12 Sep, 2017
Our new Explore Evenings option will be available starting from the week of 9th October 2017- each course will cost £65.
By Louise Freeman 12 Sep, 2017

Our next FREE taster event will be on  Tuesday 26th September from 11.00 to 13.00at Commercial Union House.  Book now via this link

Come and try our taster experience - lectures by our expert tutors in our welcoming centre on the 4th floor of Commercial Union House.

John Griffiths will be talking about local history - on this occasion - the history of the Newcastle central motorway followed by Anthea Lang on Gibside and author Max Adams with an introduction to his autumn course on trees.

By Louise Freeman 12 Sep, 2017

Our new patron, historian John Grundy, turns his attention to the history of Newcastle upon Tyne.  In his inimitable style he tackles questions such as… 

  • Where did the Roman bridge at Newcastle actually lead to? 

  • What did St Wilfred choose as a holiday souvenir from his trip to Rome? 

  • Why did medieval Newcastle need town walls?

  • How was Newcastle reviewed on the 17 th century version of TripAdvisor?

Always knowledgeable, often funny and sometimes irreverent, this talk is perfect for anyone who is passionate about our great regional capital.

Come along and hear John talk about his new book John Grundy's History of Newcastle on Saturday 23rd September at 13.00 at Newcastle City Library.  Explore tutor John Griffiths will be introducing John Grundy and letting people know about our forthcoming autumn taster!

This event is now SOLD OUT but there are still some tickets available to our free taster event - click here

Photo by Steve Brock 


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